List of second year courses

GOVT2001: THE RESISTANCE MOVEMENT

This course looks at the genesis, evolution and character of the philosophy of slave society and anti‐slavery resistance. It examines the ancestral predisposition, continuities and structure of plantation culture and anti‐slavery culture as well as the views engendered by Black resistance, White abolition and pro‐slavery thought. This course is intended to demonstrate, among other things, that the Caribbean has its own dynamic philosophical space; and that anti‐slavery struggles were rooted in a philosophy and ideology constructed and articulated by Africans enslaved in the Americas.

GOVT2003: THEORIES OF THE STATE

This course examines the contemporary debate on the nature of the state, focusing on the ideas of some of the most important philosophers. The main thinkers and issues may include Rawls, Dworkin, Gewirth, and the question of social injustice; Hayek, Nozick and the libertarian perspective; Marx and the limits of liberal democracy; and Lyotard, Foucault Habermas and the post‐modern perspective.

GOVT2004: SPORTS, POLITICS AND SOCIETY

This course exposes students to the sphere of sports as a legitimate area for social science research and analysis. To this end, we begin by reviewing approaches to the study of sports; trace the development and spread of sports in the Anglophone Caribbean, identifying the links between sports and ideological, socio‐economic and political developments in the region. We then analyse West Indies Cricket, Track and Field, Football and Netball in Jamaica, looking at their potential roles in national development.

GOVT2005: CARIBBEAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

This course focuses on the diverse currents of Caribbean Thought, which have influenced the development of Caribbean societies from colonialism to independence. Taking up from Gordon Lewis' Main Currents in Caribbean Thought, the course examines the central ideological currents of Twentieth Century political thought in the region and covers Nationalism, Pan‐Africanism, Marxism, Feminism, Democratic Socialism and Neo‐conservatism. Among some of thinkers considered are Marcus Garvey, George Padmore, C.L.R. James, Franz Fanon, Walter Rodney, Fidel Castro, Michael Manley and Bob Marley. Other themes will be drawn from a selection of contemporary newspaper columnists, talk‐show hosts and the ideas behind the major international agencies and institutions, which have shaped postindependence policies. The selection of thinkers and social movements to be examined will vary with each semester.

GOVT2006: FOUNDATIONS OF CARIBBEAN POLITICS

This course explores the distinct foundations upon which modern Caribbean politics rests. It attempts to identify the unique characteristics and experiences of Caribbean states to enrich the field of comparisons with other political systems. The special characteristics of small states, the varied impact of colonialism in the region, the nature of the political culture, along with class and ethnic influences, the founding roles of Caribbean leaders, the main state formations that have emerged, as well as the emergence of civil societies in the Caribbean are the main areas covered. The main purpose is to be able to understand the nature of contemporary Caribbean politics from the continuing impact of these foundations.

GOVT2007: POLITICS IN THE CARIBBEAN

This course focuses on the structure of and current controversies in Caribbean political systems from a comparative perspective. Many of these have to do with elections and electoral systems, political parties and party systems, the nature of political opposition, the nature of government and reforms of the state, human rights and human development, justice, crime and corruption, models of economic development, and the impact of globalization. These problems are discussed in the context of the challenges faced by the Caribbean to meet acceptable standards of democracy, development and globalization. This assessment is useful against the background of certain failures in human, economic and political development in the region and the need to explore possible correctives.

GOVT2009: INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN POLITICS

This course will introduce students to African Politics. It will begin with the background to contemporary African Politics, looking at the way African traditions and the experiences of colonialism have structured modern‐day politics. It will also examine the struggle for independence and the varieties of the post colonial state.

GOVT2010: DELINQUENCY AND JUVENILE JUSTICE


This course surveys the role of youths as both offenders and victims. It examines the local, regional and international discourse related to children and youth; and delinquency and justice. It evaluates current patterns and practices of law enforcement, the criminal court and corrections relative to youths as offenders and victims.

GOVT2011: CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

This course is about the institutional arrangements devised by societies to respond to crime. It provides an overview of the criminal justice system‐ and while not being explicitly comparative, locates the Caribbean in the wider international context offering some comparisons and contrasts with both the developed and some developing countries. It involves a survey of the politics, courts and corrections. This is done against the backdrop of the problems of definition and measurement of crime. General issues of consideration include‐ how and why the system developed in the region as it did; how theories relate to policies and how the existing system may be reformed and/or transformed. Considerable attention will be devoted to the relevance of the ideas discussed to contemporary Caribbean societies.

GOVT2012: JAMAICAN MUSIC 1962‐1982

This course explores the folk and popular music as socio‐political, cultural and philosophical instruments and expressions in the making of the African Diaspora in the Americas. Within this historical context, the course examines, through popular Jamaican music (Ska, Rock Steady and Reggae) ideas of grass root Jamaicans about freedom, justice, human rights, power, the nature of the state, social and political behaviour since independence. It seeks to ascertain/measure the intellectual/ ideological contributions of grass root Jamaicans to the making/definition of freedom, justice, human rights etc. in the development of the Jamaican polity, as well as to establish that grass root Jamaicans are part of the tradition of subjected peoples the world over who have contributed to the making of freedom as one of the most important values.

GOVT2013: RESEARCH METHODS I (Year Long – 6 Credits)


This course will attempt to build on elementary knowledge of statistics provided in the first year of the degree programme and to apply these tools to a specified range of topics. The course is divided into three phases. The first will be devoted to reviewing the methodological underpinnings of empirical research in the social sciences and in‐depth review of published research relating to the specified range of topics. The second will involve the use of statistical computing procedures to analyze data. The third phase will be devoted to supervising projects.

GOVT2017: ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN POLITICS

This course will focus on issues of current relevance in African politics. These will include issues such as: ethnicity and regionalism, economic performance and structural adjustment, the end of Apartheid and the future of Africa.

GOVT2032: ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYSIS

This course seeks to develop students' understanding of some of the explanatory and normative theories used in Public Sector Management and to apply these theories to specific aspects of public management. Students should have undertaken Introduction to Public Sector Management before undertaking this course. The course is intended to provide the theoretical and conceptual tools that will be required for the analysis of substantive areas of study to be taken at advanced level.

GOVT2033: CONTESTED ISSUES IN PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT

This course seeks to concentrate on some theoretical issues, current trends and major problem areas, by applying techniques of administrative analysis.

GOVT2046: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: THEORIES AND APPROACHES

This course covers a sample of the old, the new and the different in the theoretical discourse of the discipline of International Relations. It takes as its starting point the view that theory helps us to understand the world and to understand why we, as individuals think the way we do. Thus students are encouraged to critically assess not just other people's ideas about International Relations but their own as well.

GOVT2047: PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

This course provides an introduction to Public International Law and considers the contribution made by Public International Law to the preservation of friendly relations between the states. Emphasis is placed on the more practical aspects of the law, with focus on topics which those who enter the professional sphere of foreign affairs might be expected to encounter on a regular basis. Such topics include jurisdiction and immunities, state responsibility and recognition. Some attempt is made to cover the role of law in wider international political issues such as terrorism and regional conflict.

GOVT2048: INTERNATIONAL AND REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

This course provides an introduction to International Organizations, emphasizing cooperative activities involving governments. It concentrates on critically examining the theories, origin, structures and current status of international and regional organizations in the study of world politics.

GOVT2049: INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This course is based on the premise that the study of International Relations must take into account the inter‐ relation‐ship between the economic and the political. It introduces students to political economy perspectives and applies this analytic approach to the study of such issues as the liberal international economic order and distributive justice, and the international financial system and policy co‐ordination.

GOVT2050: CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW FOR PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGERS

This is an introductory course on the intersection of public service with law. Civil servants, the role of law and the courts along with the Jamaican constitution are considered inter‐related topics. Course design is such that public sector management students learn about the legal system (both in Jamaica and in a comparative sense) while also providing insight to the particular concerns, contradictions and outcomes of public service life. The relationship between civil servant and lawyer is often adversarial. This is unfortunate given their complementary tasks to ensure that government runs effectively, economically, efficiently and equitably toward the service of its citizens. The rule of law and the relationships of courts and judges to administrative life are integral to public service.

GOVT2101: JAMAICAN POLITICS IN THE POST INDEPENDENCE

A This course will introduce students to the central issues in Jamaica electoral politics since independence. It provides a historical overview of politics in Jamaica and examines the origins of the Westminster system of government. Students will study individual elections and assess the major trends themes that have developed over the years. This course will cover issues such as party organization, the administration of elections, voter trends and patterns and campaigning. Issues of constituency politics including political; tribalism, patronage and corruption, garrisons, political violence and the corruption of elections will also be explored. A substantial part of the course will be devoted to efforts to change and improve elections in the country. To this end, GOVT2101 will explore the role of civil society, constitutional reform, and external elements in improving the efficiency of the electoral system. The last module considers issues of constitutional change campaign financing, political accountability, sanctions and the role of the media.