List of third year courses

GOVT3030: VALUES AND PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT


This course introduces students to approaches to ethical reasoning and provides a frame of reference for examining contemporary practice. Interactions between public sector managers and other internal and external stakeholders, including the general public, private sector and non‐government organizations, are given special attention. The course critically examines the responsibility of public managers for the power that they exercise, assesses the ethical standards that public managers bring to decision making, examines the mechanisms employed to ensure ethical standards, and make recommendations to improve the ethics infrastructure.

GOVT3032: SELECTED ISSUES IN PUBLIC POLICY AND PUBLIC SECTOR MGMT


This course is designed to help develop and apply the analytical skills needed by public managers to a number of topical issues. The content of this course is therefore intended to “practicalize” the students' theoretical knowledge. The delivery method will be primarily through guest lectures, field trips and case analysis. The main emphasis of this course will be on contemporary controversies and themes. These will be related to a settled body of ideas and concepts that comprise the core of the discipline. This course is intended to act as a capstone for all students doing studies in Public Sector Management and its topical content will change from year to year.


GOVT3008: COMPARATIVE REVOLUTIONS


The aim is to acquaint the student with the rich theoretical and narrative history on revolutionary movements in the light of the practical experiences of a selection of contemporary and history revolutions. It will be divided into two parts. The first will examine the various theories on the causes of revolutions, through Marx, Brinton, Johnson, Tilly, Barrington Moore, Trimberger, Theda Skocpol, to Wallerstein, Eisenstadt and Unger. The second will survey in detail the experience of Cuba, Grenada and Nicaragua in the light of the other contemporary and historical examples of revolution and of the theoretical constructs established in the first part. From time to time the examples of revolution may be varied to reflect the rich and variegated international experience.


GOVT3009: THE POLITICS OF INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES


This course will lay the foundations for the study of the politics of industrial societies, with a focus on North America and Western Europe. It will look at the emergence of liberal democracy, and the practice of politics in industrial societies including political parties, elections, electoral systems and the media.

GOVT3010: PUNISHMENT AND CORRECTIONS


This course examines the development of ideologies pertaining to the punishment of offenders. It explores the rationale for imprisonment, including retribution, incapacitation, and rehabilitation and critically examines past and existing penal doctrines in Jamaica. Alternatives to incarceration and current ideas about penal reform are also critical examined.


GOVT3011: VIOLENCE AND DEVELOPMENT


This course examines the historical changes in the patterns and meanings of violence globally. Special attention is paid to individual, collective and state violence in the Caribbean context. The main theories explaining the causes of violence and current research on attitudes to violence and the use of force to bring about social political change are reviewed. Strategies of conflict management and prevention and their relationship to development and the transformation of political culture and state institutions that seek to monopolize the legitimate use of violence are discussed.


GOVT3012: CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL ISSUES


This course will focus on issues of current relevance in industrial societies, with emphasis on Western Europe and North America. It will analyze the extent of cynicism towards politics, the various tendencies in the political system, issues of economic transformation and changes in the state.


GOVT3016: LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS AND DEVELOPMENT


This course introduces students to Latin American Political Institutional Developments and Major Economic Changes in the 20th century.


GOVT3022: GARVEYISM IN THE AMERICAS/AFRICA


The focus of this course is on the development of Garveyism as a social movement in the early decades of the twentieth century and its impact on contemporary movements for decolonization in the Diaspora and in Africa. The socio‐political practice of the Garvey movement will be examined in order to ascertain its Pan‐ Africanist appeal. Students will be exposed to primary source materials at the National Library of Jamaica, the multi‐volume Marcus Garvey and the UNIA Paper
and recent literature on the Garvey movement.


GOVT3033: CONCEPTS AND THEORIES OF PUBLIC POLICY


This course will consist of an examination of public choice and public goods allocation theories. This will be done in the context of policy analysis and the various considerations and limitations of this process.

GOVT3034: COMPARATIVE DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT


This course is designed as a broad overview of critical approaches pertaining to the management of development issues, mainly in the Third World. The aim is to help students understand and evaluate conceptual and practical approaches to development management. It will focus on key economic, institutional, policy and management issues, particularly as they relate to administrative capacity building, policy implementation and problem solving. The role of the international policy network in development episodes will be highlighted.


GOVT3035: PUBLIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT


This course will examine the principal aspects of public sector finances, their sources and expenditures and study the administrative (legal) framework, which exist to use funds as development component of the Caribbean and other developing countries. Students will also gain insight into the accountability aspects regarding public finances and the extent to which modern managerial quantitative techniques can be used for and forecasting purposes.


GOVT3036: TECHNIQUES OF PUBLIC ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION


This course aims at giving students a moderate depth of knowledge of Policy Analysis Techniques. Students will also obtain hands‐on application.

GOVT3043: DEMOCRACY AND DEMOCRATIZATION IN THE MODERN WORLD


(Year Long – 6 Credits)
This course will entail a normative and empirical examination of the processes of democracy and democratization in the Modern World. The pluralist competitive approach constitutes our fundamental point of departure. Its essential nature and characteristics are closely examined with a view towards arriving at clear understandings regarding the inauguration, development, institutionalization impact and relevance of pluralist democratic regimes.

GOVT3048:CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS OF THE CARIBBEAN


This course will identify and analyze various stages in the development of Caribbean states' participation and profile in International Relations from 1970 to the present. Focus will be on the dominant norms, influences, patterns and instruments which have characterized their participation in multilateral diplomacy, economic and security relations.


GOVT3050: COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY: DEVELOPED AND DEVELOPING
STATES


Foreign Policy is the primary means through which states interact with each other. Each year the foreign policies of at least two states are chosen as the focus of this course e.g. Over the years we have examined the foreign policies of Japan, United States of America, Britain, China and India. The course involves vigorous research, thinking and writing about the main trends in the foreign policy of selected states. Particular emphasis is placed on the domestic and international factors that affect the making of the foreign policy, the institutions involved in the execution of foreign policy and the main issues that dominate the foreign policy agenda. GOVT3051: INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DEVELOPMENT: SELECTED ISSUES This course examines some of the ways in which Public International Law contributes, or may contribute, to development in a number of discrete contexts. In particular, it requires students to examine international legal rules with respect to Human Rights, the Law of the Sea, Counter‐Narcotics efforts, and Investment to assess the extent to which these rules promote or undermine economic development.


GOVT3052: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

This is a seminar which focuses on contemporary and/or typical issues that are of critical and significant importance to the structure, nature and status of international relations. Issues include those which are not traditional areas of study but which could be so as the discipline evolves.

GOVT3055: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF INTERNATIONAL NEGOTIATIONS

It is impossible to conceive of world affairs in the absence of the bargaining table. In this course students are exposed to the theory and practice, the art and science of negotiations through a variety of teaching methods ‐ guest lectures from
practitioners, simulations and critical discussion. The aim is to enable students to explain and understand negotiation outcomes, as well as to give them practical experience in the conduct of negotiations

GOVT3056: INTERNSHIP IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS


Each student will be required to spend a minimum of four weeks in a major institution and to provide a report describing and assessing this experience. The idea is to familiarize and expose students to the working environment of International Relations. This course is now open to a limited number of 3rd year International Relations Majors, selected on the basis of their grades. Other International Relations Majors will do GT36M as a compulsory course and available
elective.


GOVT3114: INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ISSUES


The course focuses on two (2) broad areas in the study of international security. First, it provides an introduction and analysis of the historical, conceptual and contextual themes of the discipline. In particular, realism, deterrence and offencedefence theories will inform the discourse on the ‘security dilemma', the nuclear weapons debate and the arms race. Second, it analyses of the main security challenges (both past and present), such as the role of nuclear weapons proliferation and the arms race as threats to international security, as well as the significance of drug trafficking for the Caribbean region. Special emphasis will be placed on the ways in which individual states and organizations, particularly the United Nations (UN), the Organization of American States (OAS), and the Regional Security System, respond to these security challenges.
While maintaining the traditional state‐centric approach in highlighting the role of the nation‐state in responding to these changes, students will be introduced to the new international reality of non‐state actors, for example drug traffickers in posing threats to the system. They will also be introduced to the formulation of security responses which excludes the state, such as private security (including the establishment of security companies to protect citizens based on a perception of the failure of the State to provide such security).


GOVT3115: PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME


(Year Long – 6 Credits)
The internship is a new, exciting, practical and compulsory programme for all students entering the Public Sector Management Major in 2009. The internship, usually taken in the summer over six weeks, provides a student with the opportunity to participate in and observe, as a full‐time working member of the staff, the daily administrative or policy‐related activities of a ministry, agency or department of the Government of Jamaica. The internship is a learning situation structured along two streams based on the student's prior experience in the public sector and involves the intern, the agency supervisor, and the faculty supervisor. It provides an opportunity for a student to use the skills and experience gained during the first two years of his or her academic program in a way that is mutually beneficial to the student and the agency, and a learning experience for the student which will enhance his or her potential for either entry into or advancement into the public sector. Adequate supervision, educational assignments, and practical benefit to the agency and student comprise the core < methodological considerations in the internship.